Cookie settings

We use several types of cookies on this website to provide you with an optimal online experience, to increase the user-friendliness of our portal and to constantly improve our communication with you. You can decide which categories you want to allow and which you do not want to allow (see "Custom settings" for more information).
Name Usage Duration
privacylayerStatus Agreement Cookie hint1 year
vote_*Saving the tuning state to a videoJanuary 2038
Name Usage Duration
_gaGoogle Analytics2 years
_gidGoogle Analytics1 day
_gatGoogle Analytics1 minute
_galiGoogle Analytics30 seconds

Watchlist

You have the following 0 movies on your watchlist

Menu
27th International Film Festival

for Children and Young Audience

8 – 15 OCT 2022

Come on, Let's Find a Treasure


Original title: Janosch - Komm, wir finden einen Schatz
German title: Janosch - Komm, wir finden einen Schatz
74 min
-
2012
Germany
from 5 years
Direction: Irina Probost
Script: Nana Meyer

SCHLINGEL Year

2012 | German Focus


Additional Information
Music
Marius Ruhland

”When my nose rings,” Baer says while fishing, “it means that something great is happening.” Tiger and Bear really discover a mysterious wooden chest with a faded treasure map at the bottom of the lake. Who can stay at home in such a situation? Tiger and Bear decide to set out and find the treasure. But the map is torn during an argument and one half of it flies away. Nevertheless, they start their journey. The lonely rabbit Jochen Gummy Bear joins them. Actually, he does not look for a treasure, but only for true friends. The missing half of the map, however, is blown by a gust of wind right into in the face of greedy detective Gokatz. Already dreaming of great wealth, he persuades Kurt the dog to pursue the three and steal their treasure. They run through ink swamps and ice deserts up to a high mountain, which contains an old pirate ship. “Janosch – Come on, Let's Find a Treasure” is the screen adaptation of an important part of Janosch’s children's book trilogy with Tiger and Bear, which also includes “Oh, How Beautiful Panama Is” and “Post for the Tiger”, filmed 33 years after its publication.